Salento is a small town in the middle of Colombia’s Zona Cafetera, the coffee region south of Medellin. It has a nice central square, colorful old buildings and a lively main street full of bars, restaurants, boutiques and souvenir shops. The town is surrounded by lush green hills good for hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding and coffee tours. But most people come here to see the towering wax palm, Colombia’s national tree, in surreal Valle de Cocora.  Read more…

In Central America everybody is either traveling south or north on more or less the same Gringo Trail. Which makes it easy to catch up on stories and information on the countries we are heading to. Like Nicaragua. We only heard good about the country. Supposedly cheap and the people are friendly. And, even though nobody could really point out the must-sees, everybody seemed to linger longer than planned. We were curious.  Read more…

The tourist shuttle from Copan Ruinas to Santa Ana in El Salvador costs around 40 USD per person. That’s maybe a good option if you’re short on time but an awful lot of money otherwise. So we decided to make the trip using local transport. Here’s how to travel the cheap way from Copán Ruinas in Honduras to Santa Ana in El Salvador. And see some interesting, off the beaten track places on the way.  Read more…

When travelling through Guatemala there’s hardly anyone talking about visiting the Mayan ruins of Copán in Honduras. Which is strange because with close proximity to the Guatemalan border they are easy to add to the itinerary. Maybe it’s because most people think they’re not worth visiting after having already seen the more majestic temples of Tikal. We ignored everything we heard and read about it and went anyway. And we’re glad we did!  Read more…

Wherever you are in Guatemala you will hear other travellers raving about Semuc Champey. And they’re right. It’s a place of mesmerizing beauty in the highlands of Alta Verapaz. Semuc Champey is a natural limestone bridge over the Cahabón river consisting of a series of staggering, turquoise pools which are good for swimming. If that’s not enough, the area has some exciting caves to explore and rivers to tube down on. Ready to go?  Read more…

After two months of intense traveling, largely due to our migration from Asia to the Americas, we strongly crave some down time at the beach. We leave the churches, colonial buildings, chocolate and festivities of Oaxaca de Juárez behind and make our way to Zipolite and Mazunte, small hippie havens on Mexico’s Pacific coast.  Read more…

Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Death, is a celebration (definitely not a mourning) where family and friends gather to remember and pray for their departed loved ones. People go to cemeteries to be with the souls of the departed and build decorated ofrendas (altars) to offer the favorite food and drinks, as well as photos and memorabilia, of the departed. The intent is to encourage visits by the souls, so the souls will hear the prayers and the comments of the living directed to them. Soon after we had arrived in Oaxaca we found out that Dia de Muertos is taking place next weekend. Reason enough to linger a little longer than planned.  Read more…

About Us

Hi there! Thanks for coming by. We are Domingo & Carina from Holland. In July 2013 we started travelling the world for about 2 years. On this blog we share our stories about this journey. About how we get ready for this adventure, the lifestyle on the road, the places we visit, and the people we meet.

I hope you enjoy reading it! And maybe we inspire you. Learn more…

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